Posted in Photo Challenge, photography

Camera Lucida – Reflections

Salishan Reflections1

The ocean is always fascinating to me, and on days like this one, the lighting was perfect for capturing reflections in Yaquina Bay. I love this photo taken during the photoshoot for the Salishan Cowl – precisely because of the beauty of the reflecting sky and the shimmering reflected fishing boats. Even the colors reflect. In this picture, everything is more important than the cowl – hence it did not end up in the pattern. But I love it!

This week’s theme: Reflections

  1. the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat, or sound without absorbing it
  2. an amount of light, heat, or sound that is reflected by a body or surface

It’s always interesting to look at reflections…are they really the same as the reality?

How many times did you look at your own reflection and wondered if that’s how the world sees you…?

This week’s theme is: Reflections…show us how we look at the world upside down…how we see ourselves from the other side…how water seems to be the borderline between reality and imagination…show us who looks back from the mirror…make this week your own and tell us a story that will make us reflect:)

Two other photos taken at the same time:

Salishan Reflections2

Salishan Reflections3

Camera Lucida – Reflections

Posted in Photo Challenge, Salishan

Camera Lucida: Metal

pump, lavender cowl, grass, tree

As promised, my Camera Lucida entries are knitting-related in some way.   This rusted remnant of days gone by stands beside the pathway to the Salishan Spit.  It was on my second hike to the Spit, the photoshoot for the Salishan Cowl, that I took this photo.   The water pump had caught my eye before, and I thought perhaps it would be an interesting way to style the cowl.  None of the pictures of the water pump made it into the pattern or onto the Ravelry pattern page, but I still think the elegance of the line of the water pump juxtaposed with the rusting iron makes an interesting image, and I share it here as my entry in this week’s Camera Lucida photo challenge.


 

This week’s theme: Metal

  1. a solid material which is typically hard, shiny, malleable, fusible, and ductile, with good electrical and thermal conductivity (e.g. iron, gold, silver, and aluminium, and alloys such as steel).
  2. broken stone for use in road-making.
    “the work also involves dealing with rock aggregates for potential use as suitable road metal”

This week I am brining you into a new world…a different way of looking at something that all of us have around but rarely would we consider it art…the use of metal. Take a look around you and find that simple and maybe insignificant, sometimes even dangerous piece of rust that brings to life emotions…a different spark in our eyes and a modern interpretation of rudimentary.

Show your unique view on this weeks’ theme, bring us your best art…might that be a bridge of locks that tell a story, the old barn door with nails sticking out, a sculpture covered by rust but full of character or your personalised DIY tool box …this week anything metal goes 🙂

#cameralucida

Posted in design, In The Wind Yarns, inspiration, knitting, knitting patterns, Oregon, pattern, Salishan, The Creative Process, The Design Process, Uncategorized

Salishan Cowl: A Look into the Design Process

The Salishan Cowl is another pattern which lends itself to a look into the design process. In this case, it was a matter of being immersed in a place as well as spending time pondering the building blocks of knit design, the stitches.

The place:

Salishan sign bestI’ve lived in Oregon for 25 years now, and have known of the Salishan Spa & Golf Resort since shortly after we moved here.  I’ve driven by it numerous times, but it wasn’t until last August that I finally stayed there.

When I arrived, I wasn’t sure what to expect.  I found that the grounds were quiet and peaceful.  The room was spacious; there was a choice of restaurants and the food was delicious.  The atmosphere was that of a mountain lodge even though the ocean was within walking distance.

This was to be one of my retreats at the beach, where I spend time knitting, resting, designing.  I spent the first few days knitting, taking walks and puttering around.  I threw a bunch of yarn (collected over the years) on a table, hoping that color combinations would jump out at me and inspire some designs:

yarn

The yarn led me down dead end paths.  Perhaps they were dead end at the time and may yet lead to new designs.  Time will tell.

As it turned out, though, the inspiration came from the place itself.

The resort is situated so that the lodge, restaurants and accommodations are on the east side of Highway 101.  It’s about 1/4 mile walk from the rooms to the highway, which you cross to the golf course, spa and shops.

shops sign

There’s even a lovely yarn shop in The Shops, In The Wind Yarns.  It was new to me then, but now it’s a must-stop place whenever I go to the Coast.   I love to visit and see all the new things they are working on and what new yarns they’re bringing in.  There’s always something fun going on!

ITW Storefront II

But I digress!  At last I was going to explore the Salishan Spit, which I had always been curious about. Viewing across the Siletz Bay from Highway 101, there is a thin slice of land with houses on it.   How does one get there?  During my stay, I learned that The Spit is accessible by car only to residents of the gated community or to guests of the resort.  Otherwise, it may be accessed by foot on a trail which begins next to the shops and golf course.

Map of Salishan Spit, Lincoln Beach, OR 97388

It’s a long hike to traverse the length of the spit.  As I approached the end of the spit, I turned a corner and was shocked to discover that we had black (or dark gray) sand on an Oregon beach! It was one of those amazing moments when you find something completely unexpected.  I had absolutely no idea we had a dark sand beach in Oregon.

You can see the dark sand over the light here:

DSCN5050

DSCN5907

And these organic shapes and lines:

kelp

DSCN5053

tree skeleton

It was all hauntingly beautiful.

The building blocks:

Also during my stay at Salishan, I spent time poring over my stitch dictionaries.  One stitch in particular, the Japanese Feather, struck me as very beautiful and elegant.  An added bonus:  as far as lace stitches go, it’s pretty straightforward and easy.  And it’s apparent to me that my subconscious zeroed in on that stitch pattern as a representation of all the lovely lines and shapes I had seen during my wanderings – even including that “S” in the Salishan signs.

The process and the pattern:

During the next six months, the impressions from Salishan and the thoughts of that stitch remained with me.  Sometime in December of 2014 or early January 2015, I found the perfect edging for the cowl: the Herringbone Stitch.  It would create a pleasing contrast of a highly structured edging with the organic shape of the Japanese Feather.  Additionally, it was a stitch that wasn’t being used by a large number of designers, so it would create a unique look.  And finally, it’s a fun stitch to work, albeit time consuming.

The pattern also includes the option of working a Seed Stitch border.  It is easier and quicker than the Herringbone Stitch border, and it still creates an elegant look.

Worked in Malabrigo Silky Merino, this cowl just floats!  It also is lovely in Rowan Felted Tweed.

Salishan in itw window
This luminous Salishan Cowl in the window at In The Wind Yarns was made by Janet

This design is really one of my favorites. Not only do I feel like a million bucks whenever I wear this cowl, but I have the treasured memory of finding this beautiful and unexpected, somewhat hard-to-reach beach, which I hope to visit many, many more times in the future.